CUA Dissertations

Pages

Biblical Concepts of Divine Protection: A Study of Psalms 5, 91, and 140 in Light of the Iconography of the Ancient Near East
Degree awarded: Ph.D. Biblical Studies. The Catholic University of America, Taking a holistic approach to individual psalms as distinct and complete poems, this study explores the topic of divine protection in the Psalter. Specifically, three psalms are analyzed: Psalms 5, 91, and 140. The study is a contribution to a growing body of research that systematically incorporates iconographic material in biblical exegesis. The contribution is unique in that (1) it compares ancient Near Eastern iconography to whole poems, in contrast to thematic treatments that have not, and (2) it considers modern linguistic approaches to biblical poetics. The first two chapters review past research on the topic of divine protection in the Book of Psalms and introduce comparative research using the art of the ancient Near East. The following three chapters discuss the three psalms under investigation: Psalms 5, 91, and 140. In each of the chapters on an individual psalm, the research unfolds along two lines. First, there is an examination of the relevant vocabulary and structure. Each psalm is analyzed using the syntactic approach of M. O'Connor's in Hebrew Verse Structure. The second aspect of the study in chapters 3-5 explores the concepts of protection in the selected psalms in light of the ideas of divine protection expressed in the iconography of the ancient Near East. The literary imagery of protection in the psalms is compared with the iconographic imagery of protection as it appears in the miniature art of the Levant as well as the monumental art of Egypt and Mesopotamia. The study provides a new of method of approach and offers a fuller and clearer sense of the biblical notions of divine protection, not, however, in the form of a single overarching theme. Studying the topic of divine protection offers a complex and multifaceted viewpoint; the findings do not produce a single concept of divine protection. The three psalms separately conceptualized divine protection in at least three different ways; thus, there are concepts of divine protection in the psalms., Made available in DSpace on 2011-06-24T17:13:19Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Plescia_cua_0043A_10231display.pdf: 46485614 bytes, checksum: 8778e008f50a2b88780f9da062751bbd (MD5)
The Biblical Hebrew Transitivity Alternation in Cognitive Linguistic Perspective
Degree Awarded: Ph.D. Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures. The Catholic University of America, That there exists a group of biblical Hebrew verbs which appear in both transitive and intransitive grammatical constructions has long been recognized. However, explanations of this phenomenon among modern BH grammarians, especially regarding the grammatical status of the Object, have been unsatisfactorily vague. Many issues relevant to the BH transitivity alternation (e.g. valency, transitivity, lability, verb classes, and constructional semantics) have received sustained treatment in the broader linguistic community. The purpose of this dissertation is to offer an extended treatment of the BH transitivity alternation utilizing the theory and methods of Cognitive Grammar and the related (sub)discipline Construction Grammar. This investigation explains the relationship of these BH verbs to their associated nouns with reference to the prototypical and schematic transitive event. Many BH verbs which permit the transitivity alternation exhibit significant semantic overlap allowing them to be categorized and analyzed as "verb classes." The benefit of analyzing verbs by class is that it increases the amount of data (an important feature when working with a dead language) and, more importantly, it enables the isolation of common lexical qualities that contribute to a verb's ability to appear in alternate constructions. The BH verb classes analyzed are: Verbs of Dressing and Undressing ,Verbs of Dwelling, and Verbs of Fullness and Want. After a consideration of BH verb classes, the same methods are applied to a selection of miscellaneous BH verbs which also exhibit the transitivity alternation. This study concludes that the BH transitivity alternation is licensed and limited by conceptual factors. Though often translated and interpreted as essentially synonymous expressions, verbs exhibiting the transitivity alternation actually offer alternate construals of the realities they represent and therefore should be regarded as having different meanings. It is argued that the meaning of these BH verbs must be established on the basis of the unique combination of verbal and constructional (or syntactic) semantics. Both transitive and intransitive constructions construe verbal meaning in accordance with certain conventionalized image schemas. Such construal is based, at least in part, on the imagination, goals, and intentions of the speaker.
The Biblical Homilies of Ephraem Graecus
Degree Awarded: Ph.D. Biblical Studies. The Catholic University of America, Ephrem the Syrian (ca. 306-373) is one of the most revered figures of EasternChristianity and one of the few people canonized in both the Eastern and Western Churches. Ephrem's renown spread beyond the boundaries of Syriac-speaking Christendom and attracted the interest of Greek-speaking Christians. Demand for more information about this figure sparked production of texts about and putatively by Ephrem in many languages, including Greek. Ultimately, the number of Greek texts attributed to Ephrem ranks second to only John Chrysostom. These texts, known as the Ephraem Graecus corpus, have gone relatively unstudied as the works are almost certainly inauthentic. Ephrem composed exclusively in Syriac. Nevertheless, the texts have been influential in the history of Christianity, providing some of the foundational texts of Orthodox monasticism and inspiring theologians such as John Wesley. This study seeks to explore the portion of the corpus on the topic of biblical exegesis. It provides the first ever English translation of many of these homilies. The homilies evince a creative style of exegesis relatively unknown in Western Christianity but which does appear in Syriac. These works imaginatively retell the biblical stories, inventing new dialogue and situations for the familiar characters within their established narratives. This study argues that the homilies transport the audience into a dramatic re-creation of the biblical stories where they encounter the biblical figures in a new way which emphasizes the humor, pathos, and the humanity of the characters in Scripture. A work on Joseph translated here, e.g., depicts Joseph momentarily freeing himself from his Ishmaelite captors to fall on his mother's grave and cry out to her in Hebrew, an act misinterpreted by the fearful Ishmaelites as necromancy. This episode is known from Jewish and Syriac Christian exegesis on this story, but is not attested by the Greek-speaking Christian tradition. This study argues that the Ephraem Graecus corpus is an important case study for understanding the interconnected, multi-lingual world of Late Antique Christianity. The anonymous author of the Ephraem Graecus corpus created literature for a group of Christians reflecting Syriac concerns, motifs, and interests but in the Greek language.
Bilingualism, Cognition, and Successful Aging
Degree awarded: Ph.D. Psychology. The Catholic University of America, This dissertation aimed to answer the following questions: (1) Does bilingualism affect performance in an implicit sequence-learning task and an executive control task? (2) Specifically, do older bilinguals show increased performance measures than older monolinguals in an implicit sequence-learning task and an executive control task? (3) Are second language proficiency, language usage, and age of acquisition important factors in acquiring cognitive benefits? College-aged and older adult Spanish-English bilinguals and English monolinguals participated. With traditional analyses, young bilinguals demonstrated greater executive control than young monolinguals, but the older groups performed the same. Novel distributional analyses uncovered differences among the older groups, such that older bilinguals had better executive control than older monolinguals. Bilinguals and monolinguals performed equivalently on the implicit-sequence learning task. Second language proficiency and language usage did not affect performance on either task, but bilinguals who had been speaking two languages from a young age performed better than people who learned a second language later in life on both the implicit sequence-learning task and the executive control task. Implications are discussed., Made available in DSpace on 2011-02-24T20:48:49Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Romano_cua_0043D_10027display.pdf: 1356932 bytes, checksum: 47e4343966a3d40092ad775bb6544422 (MD5)
The Bill of Rights and Federalism: An Interpretation in Light of the Unwritten Constitution
Degree awarded: Ph.D. Politics. The Catholic University of America, According to conventional understanding, the primary purpose behind the framing and ratification of the Constitution was to preserve liberty through a form of government that provided for a highly structured system of federalism and separation of powers. The primary purpose behind the framing and ratification of the Bill of Rights was to allay Anti-Federalist fears that the Constitution did not sufficiently secure individual rights. For that reason, the original Constitution is frequently contrasted with the Bill of Rights. Yet distinguishing between the Constitution and the Bill of Rights obscures more about the nature of the Bill of Rights than it discloses. It is agreed that one of the primary Anti-Federalist objections to the Constitution was the absence of a bill of rights. A close examination of the debate over the absence of a bill of rights reveals that the first ten amendments to the Constitution occupy a much more complex place in the constitutional scheme than is commonly assumed. While individual rights did constitute an important theme during the ensuing debate concerning the importance of a bill of rights, they were not the only theme or even the prevailing theme. A historically, philosophically, and textually informed examination of the Bill of Rights reveals that it was attentive to constitutional structure and was intended to reinforce the commitment to federalism in the original Constitution. The Federal government could not intrude upon the subtle and often fragile social and legal arrangements pertaining to such matters which evolved over a long period of time at the state level. These prerogatives were protected by the several state constitutions, state statutes, and the unwritten common law. This study challenges the conventional wisdom and decades of constitutional jurisprudence, which have assumed that the purpose of the Bill of Rights was to guarantee individual rights. If properly interpreted, the Bill of Rights would serve to decentralize authority, leaving many more decisions to the states and what Robert Nisbet described as "autonomous associations.", Made available in DSpace on 2011-02-24T20:46:11Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Devaney_cua_0043A_10104display.pdf: 680381 bytes, checksum: 0393c6ed28281e7641268a8f70ea6ff5 (MD5)
Biochemical Properties of MAL and MAL2 that Confer Specificity to Apical Delivery Pathways
Degree awarded: Ph.D. Biology. The Catholic University of America, My focus is to identify regulators of apical delivery in polarized epithelial cells. Each plasma membrane (PM) domain of a polarized cell performs specific functions and has a unique distribution of proteins and lipids. In simple epithelial cells, newly synthesized apical proteins take a direct route to the apical plasma membrane from the trans-Golgi network. In contrast, apical proteins in hepatocytes take an indirect transcytotic route via the basolateral membrane. Myelin and lymphocyte protein (MAL) and MAL2 have been proposed to function in direct and indirect apical targeting, respectively. Hepatocytes lack endogenous MAL consistent with the absence of direct apical targeting. Does MAL expression reroute hepatic apical residents into the direct pathway? We found that MAL expression in WIF-B cells induced the formation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipid-enriched Golgi domains that contained glycosylphosphotidyl- inositol (GPI)-anchored and single transmembrane domain (TMD) apical proteins; polymeric IgA receptor (pIgA-R), polytopic apical, and basolateral resident distributions were excluded. Basolateral delivery of newly synthesized apical residents was decreased in MAL-expressing cells concomitant with increased apical delivery; pIgA-R and basolateral resident delivery was unchanged. These data suggest that MAL rerouted selected hepatic apical proteins into the direct pathway. Recently, it was proposed that lipid-raft microdomains are too small and transient to host apically destined cargo, and that lipid-associated proteins might serve to stabilize raft-sorting platforms. Do MAL and MAL2 promote raft-stablilization and clustering? Examination of lipid-association properties revealed that MAL is raft-associated, while MAL2 is not. Does MAL and MAL2 overexpression promote lipid-association of apical proteins? MAL overexpression promoted lipid-association of both single TMD and GPI-anchored proteins whereas, MAL2 did not. Do MAL and MAL2 oligomerize to promote raft-coalescence? MAL is an oligomer and its overexpression altered the oligomeric states of single TMD and GPI-anchored apical proteins. MAL2 is monomeric and upon pIgA-R overexpression, shifted to high molecular weight fractions in velocity gradients indicating complex formation. Together, these results suggest that MAL oligomerization and lipid association may promote raft clustering and stabilization at the TGN, whereas the mechanism by which MAL2 regulates transcytosis and basolateral delivery of pIgA-R remains elusive., Made available in DSpace on 2011-03-01T11:46:50Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Ramnarayanan_cua_0043A_10158display.pdf: 7526468 bytes, checksum: 30877323c745d83fa0ace37d101e0b74 (MD5)
Blazing Walls, Blazing Brothers: Monks and the Making of the Demon in the Pachomian Koinonia
Degree awarded: Ph.D. Early Christian Studies. The Catholic University of America, Blazing Walls, Blazing Brothers:Monks and the Making of the Demon in the Pachomian KoinoniaSidney Robert Banks, Jr., Ph.D.Director: Philip Rousseau, D.Phil. This dissertation contributes to the study of late antique demonology and the development of Christian monasticism in fourth century Egypt. In particular, I explore the relationship between the development of the Pachomian Koinonia and the belief its members held about demons. While there has been no previous publication devoted to this relationship, David Brakke has included a chapter on Pachomian demonology in his book Demons and the Making of the Monk: Spiritual Combat in Early Christianity. I differ with Brakke in two general ways. First, I place greater emphasis upon the fact that demons in Late Antique Egypt were not only threats to a person's thoughts, but also to physical bodies. Second, I place greater emphasis upon what communal life added to a monk's struggle against demonic attacks both upon his body and upon his mind. In order to carry out this task, I have made a close examination of Coptic, Greek, and Latin Pachomian texts, clearly identified in the first chapter. I have also made an analysis of other texts to place the Pachomian material in the wider cultural context of fourth century Egypt. Using this material, I describe what demons were believed to be and what they were believed to be capable of doing by people living in that time and place. I then explore what role communal life played in the Pachomian attempt to resist the demons.I conclude that the communal life shared by the Pachomian monks was a source of protection against demonic attack. In the third chapter, I show that the presence of experienced monks protected the less experienced from violent demonic attack. In the fourth chapter, I show that communal life also protected the monk from demonic assaults upon his thoughts., Made available in DSpace on 2011-06-24T17:10:25Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Banks_cua_0043A_10200display.pdf: 3378361 bytes, checksum: 7c20ee1b5f3dd025a1e8e7d880bd77f6 (MD5)
Cancer, Vulnerability, and Financial Quality of Life: A Mixed Methods Study
Degree awarded: Ph.D. Social Work. The Catholic University of America, For people who are experiencing financial hardship, a cancer diagnosis can be devastating. For others, cancer may exacerbate financial stress, thereby influencing their livelihoods and their ability to maintain employment benefits (including health insurance), manage financial obligations, and participate meaningfully in cancer treatment. Financial quality of life is conceptualized here as the ability to manage all current obligations related to cancer care, within the context of sound health-care decision making. The purpose of this mixed methods study is to examine this concept in an availability sample of 90 cancer patients. In the quantitative portion, the variables that are hypothesized to affect financial quality of life include housing stability; one's sense of personal control within the larger context of health locus of control; demographic information; income/financial stress; health insurance adequacy; perceived barriers to care; social support; cancer diagnosis and acuity; and perceived ability to participate meaningfully in treatment. These variables fit within the adapted behavioral model for vulnerable populations by Gelberg, Andersen, and Leake (2000). The study is also underpinned philosophically by the difference and opportunity principles of John Rawls (1971, 1999). Bivariate correlations were examined, and multivariate analysis (ordinary least squares) was used to examine the impact of all the predictor variables on the criterion variable. The qualitative portion was an interview with seven participants from the quantitative portion. Content analysis was used to elicit the themes expressed. There were significant correlations between financial quality of life and age; housing stability; income below $10,000; health insurance adequacy; perceived barriers to care; social support; financial stress (distinct from financial quality of life); and selected aspects of treatment adherence. The multivariate regression analysis found that gender, housing stability, health insurance adequacy; fewer barriers to care; reduced financial stress; and the intentions and support/barriers aspects of treatment adherence are significant predictors of financial quality of life. Themes that emerged from the qualitative analysis (across incomes) revolved around the importance of social support; hope; creative frugality in living within one's means; dedication to treatment; and a strong sense of personal control. The research showed that this theoretical model is useful for future health-related research., Made available in DSpace on 2012-06-01T16:44:01Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Callahan_cua_0043A_10348display.pdf: 988628 bytes, checksum: e57b21bc8e996f8e6b76d2fc225b8465 (MD5)
The Canonical Form of Marriage in Latin Law and in Oriental Law: A Comparative Study with References to the Application of Catholic-Byzantine Law to Selected Pastoral Concerns in Eastern Europe.
Degree awarded: J.C.D. Canon Law. The Catholic University of America, The Canonical Form of Marriage in Latin Law and in Oriental Law: A Comparative Study with References to the Application of Catholic-Byzantine Law to Selected Pastoral Concerns in Eastern Europe.Benone Farcas, J.C.D.Director: John Beal, J.C.D.Book IV of the 1983 Code of Canon Law, title VII, chapter V and the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches, title XVI, chapter VII, article VI govern the canonical form of marriage. In many ways the provisions of the two codes are similar; in some instances, however, they differ. Both the similarities and the differences have pastoral consequences, especially in cases of mixed marriages or in territories where a hierarchical organization of various Oriental Catholic churches sui iuris does not exist. The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the canonical form of marriage by comparing the Latin and Oriental canonical legislations and analyzing the pastoral consequences that arise when laws concerning canonical form of marriage are applied in specific areas, especially in light of recent political and social changes in Eastern Europe. This comparative study of the canonical form of the marriage in the Latin and in the Catholic Oriental law, especially within the Byzantine rite, begins with an historical overview of the issue in both the Latin and the Byzantine traditions focused on specific documents and circumstances that had a significant impact on the evolution of canonical form. Subsequently, it considers the treatment of the canonical form of marriage in the 1917 Codex Iuris Canonici and post-codal legislation concerning the oriental churches, especially the motu proprio Crebrae allatae. Afterward this dissertation surveys the evolution of the issue in the conciliar and post-conciliar legislative documents. The same comparative method is applied in analyzing the present law as expressed in the 1983 Code of Canon Law and the 1990 Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches. Finally, this dissertation analyzes selected pastoral issues peculiar to Eastern Europe after the fall of the communist governments. This last section investigates canonically a few concrete problem situations related to the canonical form of marriage and proposes a tentative solution for each one. This study reveals how important is for those involved in pastoral work to be acquainted with both Latin and Oriental matrimonial legislation within the context of interecclesial relationships and within the prospect of today's increasing global mobility., Made available in DSpace on 2012-04-02T15:43:26Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Farcas_cua_0043A_10149display.pdf: 1533163 bytes, checksum: 26ebfb4da37ab681b6e320a3b1a6915c (MD5)

Pages