CUA Dissertations

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"A Monster Turned to Manly Shape": Monstrosity on the Renaissance Stage
Degree Awarded: Ph.D. English Language and Literature. The Catholic University of America, This dissertation examines the change from medieval descriptions of physically monstrous races and creatures to the depictions of monstrosity as a moral or mental state on the Renaissance stage. Renaissance audiences were still fascinated by physically grotesque monsters, as evidenced by the popularity of broadside ballads featuring monstrous births, but despite the fact that the stage is an ideal vehicle for displaying visual difference, there are very few visually remarkable monsters in Renaissance drama. This work therefore examines the villains and avengers of the Renaissance stage who look human but behave like monsters in order to provide a more complete understanding of the social, moral, and philosophical significance of their actions. Although there have been many studies of medieval monsters, there have been few studies of Renaissance monsters aside from scholars who examine the significance of the monstrous or deformed body in public exhibitions and broadsides, such as Lorraine Daston, Katherine Parks, and Mark Burnett. This study, therefore, offers a new understanding of monstrosity in the Renaissance, and how these villains are conceived of as monsters of the mind: they reject human reason and sympathy in favor of fulfilling their own monstrous passions. This dissertation contributes to the growing field of monster studies. Its offers a new interpretation of what it means to be a monster on the Renaissance stage, expanding upon the definition of monstrosity in the Renaissance to more closely align with period debates and ideas about the boundary between the human and inhuman. This study begins by outlining the late medieval understanding of monstrosity and then examining the diminishment of physical monsters in Renaissance literature. The first chapter considers medieval works such as The Sultan of Babylon and Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. The study then moves to the consideration of early modern discussions of monsters and monstrosity in Francis Bacon, Sir Thomas Browne, Michel de Montaigne, Thomas Wright, and William Rankin in order to establish what type of behavior is categorized as monstrous. In the remaining chapters, the study proceeds through a selection of Renaissance tragedies, including Norton and Sackville's Gorboduc, Thomas Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy, Christopher Marlowe's Tamburlaine The Great, and William Shakespeare's Richard III and Othello. Instead of simply creating monsters whose appearances reveal their moral corruption, these dramatists create a range of characters whose bodies may or may not be indicative of their mental state: a character who appears different (whether because of race or other physical difference) is not necessarily villainous, but the character who appears "normal" and acts kindly may hide monstrous intentions. They demonstrate that the line between human and monster lies not in the body, but in the ability to control the passions through human reason and conscience.
Abner Son of Ner: Characterization and Contribution of Saul’s Chief General
The dissertation represents the first comprehensive, academic examination of the character of Abner in the books of Samuel (1 Sam 14:50-51; 17:55–18:5; 20:25; 26:1-16; 2 Sam 2:8-32; 3:6-39), and it examines Abner’s character as it both resembles a real human being and functions as a literary device in the Masoretic Text (MT) and Septuagint (LXX). Following the examples of Sara Koenig and other biblical scholars (e.g., Robert Alter, Shimon Bar-Efrat, Adele Berlin, and Meir Sternberg), this dissertation gives attention to the ways these texts characterize Abner through direct and indirect characterization, narrative gaps, direct discourse, terminology, and grammar related to Abner, and the dissertation discusses the moral presentation of Abner in the texts and his character development from 1 Samuel into 2 Samuel. Moreover, utilizing Alex Woloch’s The One vs. The Many, the dissertation examines Abner’s character-space — the encounter between a character’s personality traits and its position within the narrative — in MT and LXX. While Abner’s character mimics a real human being in the way he is described, acts, and speaks in the stories, his character also contributes to the plots, structures, and messages of MT and LXX, and he illuminates other characters, especially Joab. The dissertation first devotes significant attention to Abner’s character-space in MT, followed by a discussion of how LXX differs from MT with respect to Abner. The dissertation concludes that Abner is a minor but complex and generally positive character who is integral to the plot of the story. Positively, Abner holds a powerful position within Saul’s court, is persuasive and shrewd, relies heavily upon rhetoric and questions, prefers peace over violence, and is widely respected by other characters. Negatively, he is lustful, presumptuous, and callous, and is an ineffectual military commander. The LXX presents Abner as a more powerful, threatening and yet merciful but less rhetorically shrewd character than does MT. As a literary device, Abner’s character symbolizes Saul and his kingdom, signals negative transitions for Saul’s house, illuminates other characters, and acts as the catalyst for the peaceful transition of power from the house of Saul to the house of David., Biblical studies, Literature, Abner, Hebrew Bible, Literary Criticism, Minor Characters, Samuel, Septuagint, Biblical Studies, Degree Awarded: Ph.D. Biblical Studies. The Catholic University of America
Abortion and Religion: The Politics of the American Catholic Bishops
Degree awarded: Ph.D. Politics. The Catholic University of America, Abortion and Religion: The Politics of the American Catholic BishopsMargaret Sammon Parsons, Ph.D.Director: Stephen Schneck, Ph.D.Prior to the 1960s, the American Catholic bishops avoided political involvement unless it directly impacted the Church. Initially, the bishops' main priority for their flock was protection from anti-Catholic discrimination and assuring the nation that Catholics were loyal and patriotic Americans. After Roe v. Wade, the bishops engaged in politics more directly by denouncing the Court's decision, thus laying the foundation for decades of debate over the issue of abortion. By 1976, candidates had recognized the importance of the Catholic vote and both parties began courting the bishops. Since then, the bishops have amassed significant political leverage, primarily due to their near-singular focus on abortion. This dissertation will be the first to examine how the bishops' decision to focus primarily on abortion has been the wellspring of their increased political power. I will discuss the history of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and its political involvement through 2008. This includes an examination of the relationship between the Catholic Church and both the Democratic and Republican parties, including a discussion of the presidential elections from 1976-2008. I will also analyze the changing attitudes toward abortion among key subgroups of the American electorate. My research shows that abortion has been the critical element of the bishops' political power for several reasons: (1) abortion attracts a significant amount of attention; (2) no American bishop favors legalized abortion; (3) the bishops have not been forced to endorse one party over the other; and (4) the tactics of some bishops (i.e., denying communion) have allowed the Church to guide parishioners toward preferred candidates without explicit endorsements. While abortion has not always been a major issue for voters, it has been critical in the expansion of the bishops' political power. As leaders of a major swing-voter group, candidates recognize the bishops' influence and actively court their endorsement. Even without abortion as a major issue in an election, a pro-choice candidate still faces major hurdles in winning the bishops' approval. As was evident in the 2004 election, without agreement on abortion, no amount of agreement on other social issues will earn a candidate episcopal approval., Made available in DSpace on 2011-06-24T17:12:58Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Parsons_cua_0043A_10192display.pdf: 1361104 bytes, checksum: dd2cb848d224feece3df1df47366a36f (MD5)
"According to All That You Demanded" (Deut 18:16): The Literary Use of Names and Leitworte as Antimonarchic Polemic in the Deuteronomistic History
Degree awarded: Ph.D. Biblical Studies. The Catholic University of America, The Deuteronomistic History (Dtr) is a story with a message for Israel in exile. It tells the story of Israel's leadership from its entry, under Moses and Joshua, into the land covenanted to its ancestors to its eventual expulsion from the land under monarchy. The story begins with the people's "request" for distance from Yhwh, a request granted in the form of intermediary prophetic leadership (Deut 18:15-22). Thereafter, Israel's deteriorating leadership situation results in further "requests." Human kingship, which Israel "demands" (1 Samuel 8-12) to remedy its leadership's failures, swiftly leads--except in rare instances--to even greater national apostasy. Israel, Judah, and their "demanded" monarchies' sins culminate in exile from the land. This study explores Dtr's thematic use of onomastic wordplay in his narrative evaluations of some of the principal figures involved in the rise and eventual fall of the monarchy in Israel and Judah, this in terms of the legislation of Deuteronomy.The names and biographies of Samuel and Saul are linked together by the Leitwort *sh'l("ask," "request," "beg," "demand"). The tragic arcs of David and his heir Solomon-Jedidiah's lives are told in terms of the Leitwort *'hb ("love") and its antonyms. The Leitwort *shlm/shalôm links David's sons Absalom and Yhwh and itself. Rather than enjoying eternal dynastic "peace" from Yhwh Solomon to Dtr's concern for Israel's loss of "peace" and "wholeness" with as boasted by Solomon (1 Kgs 2:33), David's house, including its "good" kings, experience a "peace" that fits Yhwh's program of "recompensing" Judah for its covenant violations. The fate of the priestly house of Eli is typological of the fate of Israel and Judah's royal houses as evident in Dtr's thematic play on the name "Ichabod" ("Where is the Glory?"). Dtr also plays on the names of Tiglath-pileser and Nebuchadnezzar, Israel and Judah's exilers and final despoilers, in terms of *glh (*gly) and 'ôtzar. Josiah's name is reinterpreted positively in terms of Deuteronomic "fire," but also recalling the proto-king Abimelech (Judges 9). The message to the exiles is one of warning about the nature of its "requests" from Yhwh, perhaps especially regarding Jehoiachin's son Shealtiel after the death of the former in exile., Made available in DSpace on 2014-06-20T15:48:46Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Bowen_cua_0043A_10512display.pdf: 2651007 bytes, checksum: 6354ce21b62f79dcd754f5a824647f2f (MD5)
Active Participation of the Local Church in the Enactment of the Eucharist in the Thought of Edward J. Kilmartin
Degree awarded: S.T.D. Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology. The Catholic University of America, This study investigates the pneumatological-Christological understanding of active eucharistic participation as articulated by the twentieth-century American theologian Edward J. Kilmartin, S. J. Based on a Trinitarian model of theology in connection with the insight gained from the ancient eucharistic prayers (participation in the transitus of Jesus to the Father), Kilmartin develops the notion of interior participation as emphasized by the Fathers at the Second Vatican Council (1962-65). He thus provides a "theological" approach to the "full, conscious, and active" participation as succinctly articulated by the Fathers at the Council. The participation by believers in the covenantal relationship with God, in and through the eucharistic celebration, necessarily involves a union with Christ. Kilmartin explains this union by establishing a strong pneumatological connection between Christ and believers resulting from the bestowal model of the Trinity. This union with Christ in the Spirit allows Kilmartin to demonstrate a parallel between Jesus' life of faith and the life of faith required of believers. It is the Holy Spirit, whom Christ sends to his Church, which is represented by the liturgical assembly (the ordained priest and the believers) in the eucharistic celebration, that becomes the Spirit of the Church. This Spirit enables the liturgical assembly to participate fully in the mind of Christ through appropriating the sacrificial attitudes of Christ.With Kilmartin's description of participation in "the Spirit of the faith of Christ" which this study explores and presents, a better understanding of the notion of active participation in the Eucharist can be attained in response to Vatican II exhortations as outlined in Sacrosanctum Concilium and Lumen Gentium. Furthermore, Kilmartin's comprehensive theological treatment of the subject grounded in the Trinitarian model is capable of including the various elements of active participation of Y. Congar, F. McManus, M. Collins, and J. Lamberts as treated in this study. This dissertation, therefore, argues that Kilmartin has made a significant contribution to the notion of active eucharistic participation in the post-Vatican II era., Made available in DSpace on 2012-06-01T16:44:36Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Varghese_cua_0043A_10328display.pdf: 2576156 bytes, checksum: a9bbd4054b3e4fa8d539fac9cb11f035 (MD5)
Acupuncture for the Management of Hot Flashes in Breast Cancer Survivors
Degree awarded: D.N.P. Nursing. The Catholic University of America, Acupuncture for the Management of Hot Flashes in Breast Cancer SurvivorsHollis McClellan Misiewicz, DNPDirector: Janice Agazio, PhD, CRNP, RN In the United States, more women are diagnosed with breast cancer than any other type of cancer. As earlier diagnosis and new treatment modalities increase survival for these women, health care practitioners must address long-term problems secondary to cancer therapy. The development of severe hot flashes, affecting up to 85% of breast cancer survivors, can significantly affect quality of life. Many hot flash treatments are ineffective, have intolerable side effects, or are contraindicated for breast cancer survivors. Research supports the use of acupuncture as an effective, safe treatment for minimizing hot flashes in breast cancer survivors.Purpose: The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to determine if acupuncture is effective at decreasing the number and severity of hot flashes and improving sleep in breast cancer survivors at an urban hospital. The acceptability of acupuncture as a treatment for hot flashes was also explored.Design: The study design for this project was a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest design. Qualitative data was also obtained by interview after participants completed acupuncture treatments.Methods: Eligible women completed a Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and recorded hot flash frequency and severity in a hot flash diary for a week before and after acupuncture treatment. Acceptability of acupuncture was assessed using a Likert Scale (1-10). Participants received twice weekly acupuncture treatments for four weeks. Pre and post acupuncture hot flash frequency and severity, PSQI sleep disturbance score, and acceptability ratings were compared. Participants were interviewed and descriptions of the acupuncture experience examined for themes.Results: Paired t-test revealed significant improvement in night time hot flash frequency (p = 0.04) and severity (p = 0.001). Daytime hot flash severity significantly improved (p < 0.001) although no significant difference was noted in hot flash frequency (p = 0.089). PSQI score was significantly improved following acupuncture (p = 0.021). No significant difference was found between pre and post acceptability scores (p = 0.428). Participants' descriptions of acupuncture encompassed three themes; acupuncture is (1) effective, (2) relaxing, and (3) painful at times. Conclusion: Acupuncture can be effective in reducing the severity and frequency of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors., Made available in DSpace on 2013-06-25T14:59:00Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Misiewicz_cua_0043A_10399display.pdf: 2940372 bytes, checksum: 797e864b8abd79008b4b154053e46f62 (MD5)
Ad/Dressing Modernism: Emilia Pardo Bazán's Later Short Stories (1901-1921)
Degree awarded: Ph.D. Spanish. The Catholic University of America, Ad/Dressing Modernism: Emilia Pardo Bazán's Later Short Stories (1901-1921)Martha E. Davis, Ph.D. Director: Chad C. Wright, Ph.D. Although her realist and naturalist novels have been widely researched, scholars have only recently begun to study the more than 500 short stories Emilia Pardo Bazán authored. The majority of her short story oeuvre coincides not only with the pinnacle of her feminist writings, but also with the modernist period (1880-1920). Concerned with literary as well as sartorial fashion, Pardo Bazán demonstrates a heightened awareness of her writing style, as well as her characters' style of dress and their corresponding roles as conformists or New Woman trendsetters. In this dissertation I aim to uncover how the question of "style" or "fashion" manifests itself in characters' apparel and the literary themes of Pardo Bazán's "modernist" writing. To illustrate how Modernism allowed Pardo Bazán to experiment with form and content, I draw on the short story theories of Poe, Joyce and other critics. Virginia Woolf's and Edith Wharton's reflections provide a contemporary feminist perspective on writing during what Rita Felski deems a "feminized" modern age. I refer to what Robert Johnson describes as the "social modernism" of Spanish women writers that highlights themes related to women's changing societal roles. Additionally, I use Roland Barthes' fashion theory to interpret the significance of sartorial elements in the author's short fiction. The cultural theories of J.C. Flügel, Anne Hollander and others help delineate the importance society places on clothing, fashion and the accumulation of material goods, which are central elements in Pardo Bazán's oeuvre.My research demonstrates that highlighting fashion in a modernist style allows Pardo Bazán to raise her readers' awareness of women's issues in a modernizing society, especially as they relate to education, marriage and employment. Drawing on the relative benign subjects of sewing, fashion and other interests of early twentieth-century women, the author is able to explore more "weighty" questions related to gender inequality while also demonstrating the value of women's skills and interests. By "dressing" her language in satire or parody, Pardo Bazán effectively criticizes sexism without appearing overtly feminist and thereby offending her largely conservative, bourgeois readers, thus broadening the reach of her provocative short stories., Made available in DSpace on 2011-02-24T20:46:07Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Davis_cua_0043A_10125display.pdf: 1637969 bytes, checksum: 55d05911959df92a73437ecb45153092 (MD5)
Admission of Candidates to the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin: Canons 597,641-645, Ongoing Canonical Considerations
Admission of Candidates to the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin:Canons 597, 641-645Ongoing Canonical ConsiderationsJames M. Peterson, O.F.M. Cap., J.C.D.Director: Rose McDermott, S.S.J., J.C.D.Given the scarcity of religious vocations in the Western hemisphere and the copious numbers of religious vocations in some parts of the Eastern hemisphere, candidates are often admitted without the scrutiny required by canon law. In contemporary society candidates often lack depth in Catholic doctrine, are increasingly influenced by secularism, and have difficulty making permanent commitments. This dissertation examines admission to religious institutes of men in the 1983 Code of Canon Law and recommends a procedure for the admission of candidates in accord with the vocation and identity of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin.Chapter one of this thesis reviews the norms for admission to a religious institute in the 1917 Code of Canon Law, canons 538-546 and significant post-codal documents. Human experience and developments in the social sciences brought revisions, clarifications, and additions to the law on admission to religious institutes.Chapter two studies the period from the Second Vatican Council to the promulgation of the revised Code of Canon Law. Conciliar and post-conciliar teachings reflect theological developments and further progress in the social sciences, assisting the magisterium, major superiors and formators in updating the admission process. The teachings informed the code revision process.Chapter three analyzes the revised norms on admission to the novitiate in the 1983 code, canons 597 and 641-645. Post-codal documents and a symposium reflect ongoing papal and curial concerns for the admission of suitable candidates.Chapter four examines admission to the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin. It addresses the Fourth Plenary Council, the proper law of the Capuchin Order, and the future of Capuchin formation and the development of a ratio formationis., Canon law, Admission, Candidates, Impediments, Religious Institutes, Suitability, Canon Law, Degree Awarded: J.C.D. Canon Law. The Catholic University of America

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